Academics

Discussion-Based Classes

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What is the meaning of a living tradition?  What is the nature of human nature?  What is evil?  What constitutes truth, and how do we come to know it?  What is justice?  How do we begin to think about the divine?  In this yearlong, writing-intensive humanities seminar, you’ll explore enduring questions such as these through challenging literary and cross-disciplinary readings spanning from ancient Greece to our contemporary world.  You’ll have the opportunity to strengthen your written skills, in preparation for the rest of your college career.  During each semester, you will write approximately thirty pages through a variety of formal and informal written assignments, with the chance to revise at least one formal assignment.  You’ll also develop your oral skills through seminar discussions and oral assignments.   

Stellar Faculty

Talented professors are the single greatest resource a university can provide for its students, and the scholar-teachers in the Glynn Family Honors Program are truly exceptional. All the professors who teach Glynn courses are located within a particular academic department and are recognized as both intellectual leaders in their respective fields and as excellent teachers at Notre Dame.

Read more about our 2015-16 faculty

Undergraduate Research

Research projects offer students a unique experience that cannot be duplicated in the classroom. One-on-one interaction with faculty members is particularly rewarding; learning is deepened when you develop intellectual relationships with your professors and other mentors.

The Glynn Family Honors Program was an early proponent and sponsor of undergraduate research at Notre Dame, which has now proliferated across the University. As Fr. John Jenkins said, “We want our students to see themselves not simply as passive learners, taking in information from books and lectures, but also as inquirers themselves, raising their own questions, conducting their research and knowing the exhilaration of a discovery or hard-won insight” (Annual Address to Notre Dame Faculty, September 15, 2015).

During senior year, Glynn scholars complete a capstone senior thesis project reflecting at least two semesters of original research conducted under the mentorship of a Notre Dame professor. Scholars also participate in a senior research colloquium and have a chance to present at our final research symposium.

See a sample of previous grant recipients